Title VII Office of Indian Education

  • Lumbee Tribe of NC LogoThe Lumbee Nation will be awarding scholarships to current college students enrolled for next semester and entering freshmen. Applications will be competitive. Scholarships will be awarded to students attending a technical, two or four-year college, or university.
  • The Lumbee Education and Cultural committee will weigh academic achievement, grade point average (minimum of 3.0), Native American cultural involvement, career plans, extracurricular activities, community involvement, and essay for the award.
  • Applications must be postmarked no later than March 26, 2019, at 3:30 p.m.
  • Applications may be hand delivered to the Lumbee Tribal offices in a sealed envelope or mail to tribal offices in the care of the Education Committee.
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Published by Angel Hoggard on February 28, 2019

        


Group of students who attended camp wearing their t-shirtsCumberland County Schools, Office of Indian Education selected 30 students to attend Camp DreamCatcher, a culturally-focused theatrical leadership institute on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. The four day, three-night camp offered American Indian and Alaska Native students an up-close and personal experience with college life.
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Published by Laurie Pender on June 20, 2018

        


Little boy in orange shows off the talking stick he made in classThe Office of Indian Education’s, Academic Tutor Ms. Connie Ramos, taught her American Indian students from Gray’s Creek Elementary School how to make a “Talking Stick.”    Students researched the meaning of the talking stick, images, and designs. They choose their colors, feathers, and the tribe they wanted their talking stick to represent.

The “Talking Stick” often called a speaker’s staff, is used by many tribes.  It allows council members to present their Sacred Point of view.  The talking stick is passed from one person to another; the person in possession of the stick is the only one allowed to speak.  The talking stick provides an orderly manner for one to express their point of view without being interrupted or “talked over.”  Students are encouraged to use the talking stick during meal times while traveling and during family meetings.

Ms. Ramos, who herself is from the Lumbee Nation often immerses native cultural into her teaching and tutorial lessons. Equipping American Indian/Alaskan Native students with the tools necessary to be successful and productive citizens is the goal of the Office of Indian Education.

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Published by Laurie Pender on May 25, 2018

        


Indian Education students along with Michael M. V. Pennink from Habitat for Humanity worked cleaning-up and clearing the streets of trash and debris in the B Street Neighborhood.We have all been taught that giving back to one’s community is important. Volunteering offers students a unique connection to their community and provides leadership opportunities. The Office of Indian Education’s United National Indian Tribal Youth Organization (UNITY)  encourages  American Indian/Alaska Native students to volunteer and requires such service in order to earn a Native American Graduation Stole/Cord. Volunteering can teach teens how to network, build lasting relationships, make important contacts, and work in areas that are important to them.
UNITY’S most recent community service project was held on Saturday, March 17. Our group of young students along with Michael M. V. Pennink from Habitat for Humanity worked cleaning-up and clearing the streets of trash and debris in the B Street Neighborhood.
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Published by Laurie Pender on March 26, 2018

        


The Office of Indian Education is proud to announce that Lacoma Elizabeth Jones has been awarded the United Tribes of North Carolina Scholarship. She is the daughter of Shanise Elliott. Miss Jones is a senior at Pine Forest High School and will be attending the University of North Carolina at Pembroke in the fall. Congratulations on a job well done!

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Published by Laurie Pender on March 20, 2018

        


Fourth-grade teacher William Helms from College Lakes Elementary School hosted an American Indian Celebration event Monday morning in the school’s cafeteria.

John Oxendine (Lumbee Nation) and Kaya Littleturtle (Tuscarora Nation) shared their love of culture through dancing, drumming, singing, storytelling, and Native Flute music.

The fourth graders were mesmerized by the beautiful and breathtaking Native American Regalia the men wore.  Both Oxendine and Littleturtle, entertained questions “such as “Are we allowed to attend Pow Wow’s or are they for Native Americans only?” “What do you think about the football team name, Washington Redskins?”  The men were eloquent in their answers as they explained how native people feel about those topics.

At the conclusion of the program, Oxendine and Littleturtle invited students and teachers to participate in a Friendship dance.  The Friendship Dance is a staple at Pow Wow’s. It is the one dance in which everyone is encouraged to participate.

The event was organized by the CCS’ Office of Indian Education.

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Published by Laurie Pender on November 20, 2017

        


class demonstration at 3rd Annual Camp Dreamcatcher Leadership InstituteThe Office of Indian Education held its 3rd Annual Camp Dreamcatcher Leadership Institute on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Pembroke (UNCP) the second week of June.  Twenty-Five students in grades 8-12 from across the county participated in the event.

The camp’s purpose is multi-faceted. First and foremost it teaches American Indian and Alaskan Native students that college is an attainable goal and “dreams do come true”.

Students engage in purposeful and meaningful activities during their time on campus; they experience college life up-close and personal. Living on campus, dining in the dining hall, interacting with college professors, engaging with college students, learning about college admissions, removing and/or reducing the fear-factor associated with leaving home and embracing one’s native culture is an integral part of the leadership institute.
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Published by Laurie Pender on June 30, 2017

        


UNITY (United National Indian Tribal Youth) from the Office of Indian Education, parents, and UNITY advisers led an initiative to bring awareness to the needs of homeless individuals in the community by making Sleeping Mats out of recycled shopping bags. This was a year-long project sponsored by Juanita Maurer from the Evaluation and Testing Department. The Sleeping Mats were donated to the Salvation Army for distribution.

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Published by Laurie Pender on June 26, 2017

        


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